Certification Q&A - The Details

Both levels of the Therapeutic Yoga Training Program were originally designed as continuing education courses for yoga teachers and health care professionals. In addition, various yoga centers and schools have incorporated the training as modules in their teacher training programs. In part, the establishment of a baseline of anatomy and physiology by participants through their previous training experience has enabled us to focus on expanded knowledge and techniques. During this time of the pandemic, however, we have also made the trainings open to the general public, particularly to accommodate those who would like to incorporate it into their own lives. We have done this on a bespoke basis in the past, but have decided that during this time of elevated stress, the need is great, and as the trainings have moved online, it makes it more practical to review the material, especially for those who are new to it. 
 
The question of how a course like ours relates to certifications and continuing education units is common, and the answers vary depending on the specifics of one's profession and state of residence. We always encourage attendees to check with their relevant schools, professional organizations, and state boards to confirm their particulars, but the following applie for most cases:
 
Yoga Teachers
  • For yoga teachers, Yoga Alliance is the main certification and registration body. If you are attending a yoga teacher training via a school that has been registered with Yoga Alliance, then you are looking to receive either one of the 200/500 hour RYT/E-RYT certification variations, as detailed on the YA credentialing page. If you have found our course through that training's module list, then we have already worked with your center or school (RYS) to have the Therapeutic Yoga Training count towards that certification, with each level of the training counting for 40 hours of "contact hours" credit. While YA has traditionally maintained that in-person course hours count as "contact hours", whereas online course hours count as "non-contact hours", those definitions are currently in a state of flux due to coronavirus. For the time being (at least through the end of 2020), as long as your RYS school has registered with YA to offer modules that were planned in-person to instead be online (like our training), then the planned contact-hours credit will apply. See details on the YA member updates page.
  • If you are already a certified yoga teacher and looking to fulfill continuing education credits to maintain your certification with Yoga Alliance, we are certified as Yoga Alliance Continuing Education Providers (YACEP). In addition to being YACEP providers, we register our courses as well through YA, each counting for 40 CE hours. Upon completion of the training we provide electronic copies of certificates, which you can then use as proof of continuing education. We will issue you two certificates, as Yoga Alliance requires us to use "Restorative Yoga Training Program" in their tracking system (you can then upload the "Restorative" version of the certificate to their site). For the moment, due to coronavirus, YA has made an allowance that online trainings will count as contact-hours for CE purposes (this matters because they require, for every three years of registration, at least 10 CE contact-hours and up to 20 CE non-contact hours). 
  • In general, yoga teachers will tend to, when applying to work at new centers, healthcare practices, or with private clients, give their certification along with specialties. For instance: "I am an E-RYT500 certified yoga teacher, with specializations in Therapeutic Yoga and Yin Yoga."
Yoga Therapists
  • If you are attending a yoga teacher training that has been registered with International Association of Yoga Therapists (IAYT), then you are looking to receive your 800 hour yoga therapy certification. If you have found our course through that training's module list, then we have already worked with your center or school to have the Therapeutic Yoga Training count towards that certification, with each level of the training counting for 40 hours of credit.
  • If you are already a certified yoga therapist and looking to fulfill continuing education credits to maintain your certification with IAYT, which requires a certain number of continuing education hours per 3 year time window, we are certified as continuing education providers with IAYT. As CE providers, we register our courses with IAYT, each counting for 40 CE hours. Upon completion of the training we provide electronic copies of certificates, which you can then use as proof of continuing education.
  • IAYT has recognized the need for flexibility during the coronavirus pandemic and are allowing previously scheduled trainings like ours to move online without any additional concern, at least for 2020. 
  • In general, yoga therapists will tend to, when applying to work at new centers, healthcare practices, or with private clients, give their certification along with specialties. For instance: "I am a certified yoga therapist, with specializations in Therapeutic Yoga and neurological conditions."
Nurses
  • Nurses have been a crucial part of the training since its inception (indeed our training grew out of our first visits to Rusk Institute, at Langone Medical Center in NY), and many nurses that have graduated from our training have put the techniques to use in hospitals, palliative care centers, and other healthcare settings.
  • Nursing CEU requirements vary greatly by state. Each state has its own nursing board, but not all nursing boards require continuing education providers to be registered in their state. For instance, most states will accept CE hours by providers and trainings that are registered via California's nursing board, the CBRN.
  • The Therapeutic Yoga Training Program has maintained its CBRN provider status for almost 20 years (we are registered as CEP14063), and each of our trainings count for 40 hours of CE credits with them.
  • We will issue a second certificate for nurses with our CBRN number and additional required wording for CE submission.
PTs, OTs, Massage Therapists, Acupuncturists
  • Over the years we have had attendees from these professions take the training to learn how to incorporate yoga techniques into their practices. For instance, we know of graduate acupuncturists who combine TY poses with needle treatment, and PTs who have incorporated it into spinal injury care.
  • We have found that continuing education requirements for these professions can vary wildly by state - thus, we strongly encourage potential attendees in these professions to check with their state board regarding requirements for continuing education credits. 
  • A common scenario is that as long as the attendee can submit the course syllabus with a breakdown of hours per subject, (and given that the syllabus is in fact tremendously relevant to these professions) that the state board will credit the hours. We are happy to provide the syllabus in a format amenable for this purpose. Each level of the training counts for 40 hours of continuing education for yoga teachers and nurses, and our anecdotal understanding is that this has generally applied across the board - but any final credit here is up to your particular state board. 
  • Upon completion of the training we provide electronic copies of certificates, which you can then use as proof of continuing education.
  • In general, graduates in these professions will tend to, when applying to work at new centers, healthcare practices, or with private clients, give their certification along with specialties, for instance: "I am a certified OT, with specializations in hand and wrist injuries, plus the use of Therapeutic Yoga."
For attendees not in the above identified professions
  • Upon completion of the program you will receive an electronic copy of the certificate, and you will be "Certified in Therapeutic Yoga". 
  • If you are taking the training for your own well-being and knowledge, then of course there are no other considerations. 
  • For those who are considering doing more with it, what doors it opens will vary by the state you live in, the context in which you provide and advertise services (if at all), and the requirements of potential clients and employers (if applicable).
  • In general, to be considered as, and to truthfully advertise as a certified/registered yoga teacher or yoga therapist, you need to receive a full training certification via Yoga Alliance or IAYT. And, for a yoga center, for instance, to hire you to teach group classes, they would in all likelihood require that. Requirements for individual sessions may vary greatly  though, and may simply be up to the choice of the receiving client. 
  • If you provide a combination of services under a title that is not governed by a state law or state board, or you provide services informally (to family, friends, etc), then the specifics of your particular credentials and whether those match the needs of the client will likely be up to you and the client (although, to emphasize, we recommend checking with your relevant state agencies and boards).
  • In any event, for any work that you do with clients or customers, in private or group sessions, we recommend being explicitly clear about your qualifications and certifications, for instance "I am certified in Therapeutic Yoga, Yin Yoga, and somatic bodywork - my practice combines these."